Blake Griffin Reveals The Real Reason Stars Don’t Do The Dunk Contest

I had no idea.  This must be fixed, to save the contest.  From ESPN LA:

How can the NBA entice superstar players to compete in the slam dunk contest?

Maybe all they need to do is simply ease up on all the league-mandated requirements currently attached to it, said Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin.

“It’s an all-day deal Friday and its most of the day on Saturday and you’re there all night,” Griffin said. “You have to leave the hotel 3-4 hours before and you’re taking pictures and doing all this stuff and guys just want and need a break. It would be great if you could just go out there and [dunk] but that’s not the case. You don’t see all the behind the scenes stuff.”

Griffin said he would be open to competing in the slam dunk contest next year and in the future if that was the only requirement attached to the event so he could also enjoy the rest of the all-star break with his family and friends.

“I would suggest not making it so demanding,” Griffin said. “People think it’s just the dunk contest and you just go out there and dunk but that’s not the case. You have to do the practice Thursday night and Friday and all this stuff.”

Griffin actually said he might have competed in the slam dunk contest had it not been for a condensed schedule and the fact that he was also playing in Friday night’s Rising Stars Challenge.

Do the right thing, Commissioner Stern.

[ESPN LA]

Share

A Collection Of Thoughts On The NBA All-Star Weekend

On The Dunk Contest: I watched the dunk contest in the bar of a fancy high-tech driving range in Dallas called Top Golf.  There was no volume on at the time but my group of friends provided the necessary audio when we collectively lost our minds (or alternatively booed) the dunks throughout the night.  One of the more intriguing aspects of this year’s dunk contest was that the contestants weren’t whittled down through “rounds” that culminated in a one-on-one final between two individuals.  Rather, they were all allotted the opportunity to have three dunks apiece.  This move deserves applause and hopefully  they stick with it in the future.  It worked because it helped the contest move at a much more reasonable pace and allowed the participants the security of knowing they didn’t have to stick with a “safe” dunk to move on to the finals.  The more risk involved, the more spectacular the event. 

Unfortunately there are also two obvious and unavoidable aspects that overshadowed anything good about it.  The first was the decision to allow the fans to decide the winner.  It makes a ton of sense on paper because this is the age of the internet/YouTube/etc, but I can’t tell you how dreadfully wrong the fans got it by going with Jeremy Evans.  The only thing I remember about his performance was a collective nod of the heads after he dunked two alley oop basketballs from teammate Gordon Hayward.  It was lessened by the fact that he didn’t convert on his first try. At no point though did we ever lose our minds on one of his attempts—an obvious minimum requirement for any dunk contest champion.  It’s time to go back to the celebrity/former player judging panel and live with their terribly biased decisions, if only to save the fans from themselves. 

The most glaring problem of all though is the lack of star power in the dunk contest.  I applaud the efforts and bravery–it takes a remarkable amount of fortitude to put yourself out to the world like that in front of your peers with the risk of becoming the next Chris Andersen—of the participants this year, but there’s really no point in holding it anymore so that the tenth and eleventh best players from various non-contenders can show off their unappreciated athleticism.  This point is further emphasized when the very athletes that should be participating in it are sitting front row for the action and making fun of the guys when they can’t convert their attempts (not to mention LeBron blowing every single participant out of the water with his in-game dunks during All-Star game). It would be the cultural equivalent of Brad Pitt, George Clooney, Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington, Sean Penn, etc sitting in the front row of a theater and falling over themselves laughing while a struggling wannabe actor/waiter from the nearby steakhouse attempted to recite Shakespeare in front of them. 

The dunk contest used to be a culturally relevant event.  How can it possibly still be worth the time and effort when the casual fan could identify maybe one of the four contestants?  Stern needs to drop the hammer and threaten LeBron, D-Wade, etc with the very existence of the event to force them into participating. Get the big boys in or get rid of it all together.

On Dwight Howard: This was a sort of farewell tribute for the league’s best center and I can’t help but feel that he failed to properly recognize the fans in the city of Orlando.  He gave an uninspired address prior to the game after deflecting trade rumors all weekend.  While he deserves credit for not making this weekend all about himself, he seemed largely disinterested by everything.  He didn’t take the game seriously, jacking up several three pointers and largely staying out of the way of his teammates.  For a dominant player who can entertain the fans with the best of them (and for the record, please click on that video and watch how much sheer joy Dwight brings out from his peers with his participation in the dunk contest…maybe Stern can get him to broker a deal with the big boys???  These are the thoughts of a basketball-obsessed weirdo…), his effort this year was a major #fail.  Cannot wait for his trade drama to be over.

On Kobe’s Nose Getting Broken By D-Wade: Loved it, especially how it wasn’t personal for either of them, strictly business.  Move on folks, nothing to see here!

On The Pre-Game Introductions: This is the type of thing that a hard-core basketball blogger would blast me for and where I’m admittedly reading way too much into something so please acknowledge that before proceeding.  HOWEVER, was I the only one who noticed the huge contrast between the was the West starters came out of the tunnel as compared to Dwight, Carmelo, and LeBron?  No seriously take a look.  Here’s the West (move the clip to the 5:00 mark):

And here’s the three stooges from the East making fools of themselves on national television (move the clip to the 4:45 mark):

I don’t mean to keep criticizing, but seriously, take a look at Derrick Rose’s face throughout that second clip to get an idea of the same feelings that were going through my head during that moment.  What’s equally hilarious is how you can read the “what-in-the-hell-are-these-idiots-doing” look all over Dwyane Wade’s face.  If Derrick Rose’s Bulls knock the Heat out the playoffs, this can be one of the events you point to when you tell your friends you saw it coming.  Also creepy is the way Dwight and Melo follow/mimic LeBron’s every move.  More on this later.

On The Game Itself: I’m a big fan of the high offense, no defense philosophy that seems to permeate through every league’s respective All-Star game.  One thing that is undeniably entertaining though is when the game is close during the final minutes and the best players in the world all start to care about the outcome.  We were fortunate this year that LeBron and Wade were able to erase the huge deficit for the East, but in the future I’d like to seriously recommend that the League institute a rule whereby the game has to matter in the last five minutes.  There really is nothing quite like seeing the best athletes in the world suddenly want to destroy their peers, solely for bragging rights and respect points.  Can we please see this every year?

On LeBron James And The Now Infamous Turnover: Let’s get some points out of the way before proceeding.  First, the most intriguing observation of the weekend was made by SB Nation’s Andrew Sharp in just how influential LeBron is on the league right now.  Sharp points out that all of the young players in the League now talk, dress, and act like LeBron James.  Look no further than that pre-game introduction and how Carmelo and Dwight take all their cues from him.  This is a fantastic observation that probably deserves way more investigation and I urge you to read Sharp’s column to get his take

Moving on though, LeBron James is undeniably the best basketball player alive right now.  He was solely responsible for the East’s comeback in that game and it would not have been entertaining at the end had he not put on a dazzling display of talent and athleticism.  In fact, he’s probably the most physically gifted athlete ever, in any sport.  BUT, and this is perhaps the biggest but in all of sports right now, I can’t help but feel disappointed by him.  Every. Single. Time. Always. 

Any attempt at a rational explanation is pretty much futile, but that is the feeling I get watching LeBron James.  It’s the great debate of basketball right now.  Basketball stat nerds and hard-core bloggers are unquestionably in James’ corner and rush to his defense anyone brings up the “clutch” word.  Fans and old-school writers tend to lean in the opposite direction though in their universal criticism of how he “doesn’t get it,” how he “sucks when it counts,” or how he “has no rings.” 

I tend to come down somewhere in the middle of those two extremes.  Even I was shocked though at the way he passed out of the big moment last night.  Before that infamous possession I remarked to my fiancee about how important a moment it was in the broader context of the NBA.  Should LeBron make the shot, it would do wonders for his reputation in the basketball community, or so I told her.  Never in a million years though did I think he would first pass off to Deron Williams for the big shot, then refuse to go at Kobe Bryant and eventually cough up an awful cross court pass that Blake Griffin would steal to seal the game (or pass the ball in with 1.1 seconds left to his teammate Dwyane Wade when he could have redeemed the turnover, but that’s neither here nor there). 

I was so upset I actually leapt off my couch and started taunting LeBron by yelling and pointing at my television.  I have no idea what overcame me and it’s rather embarrassing to admit. I guess the basketball snob in me is just reaching a critical breaking point with the continuous failings of the best basketball player alive in the biggest basketball moments.  You can say it really doesn’t matter and that the game was just an exhibition match anyway, but that doesn’t do it justice. 

Reading Adrian Wojnarowski this morning, you’d even learn that Kobe was BEGGING LeBron to take the shot and he still refused to pull the trigger.  And it’s not like this is some anomaly.  It’s a trend of continuous letdowns.  It’s so frustrating so let’s get this over with and come up with any kind of a conclusion. 

As a sports nerd, I’ve come to overwhelmingly trust the opinions of two groups of people when it comes to sports analysis.  The first is the advanced stats community, who as I mentioned are very quick to defend LeBron.  The second is the actual players though.  They know the real story of the league and the teams and the players and it often never reaches our ears.  They know that LeBron James is still afraid of the big moment.  They know he doesn’t want the rock when it matters.  They know that it’s going to take a Herculean effort by Dwyane Wade for this Heat team to break through and win a title.  Don’t you remember DeShawn Stevenson openly taunting LeBron in last year’s Finals with Shawn Marion?  No seriously though, look at the faces of LeBron’s peers in this video.

Share

Video Of LeBron James Refusing To Shoot In The Closing Moments Of The All-Star Game

Column coming on this later today. Quick thoughts though: look at Kobe begging LeBron to shoot and then watch Kobe/Carmelo absolutely clown LeBron for turning it over.

Share

David Stern Delivered A Shocking Ultimatum At Recent All-Star Meetings

Is the greatest commissioner in the history of American sports losing his grip?  Is this yet another brilliant play by the cold-blooded Stern?  Whatever it turns out to be, this is a must read article from Yahoo! Sports Adrian Wojnarowski.  It includes a chilling threat from Stern that is the vintage vindictive SOB you have only heard through rumors, up till this point.  From Yahoo! Sports:

Across the Staples Center locker room, the NBA’s All-Stars waited for commissioner David Stern and Players Association executive director Billy Hunter to deliver the perfunctory rah-rah remarks they regurgitate every year on the eve of the game. Only, Hunter had a different plan, unleashing an inspired soliloquy to frame the gathering storm of labor strife. And it may have just transformed the way the biggest stars in the sport see him.

The room was thick with league executives, coaches and players on the afternoon of Feb. 19, and they listened to Hunter insist he couldn’t come in good faith and tell them everything was well within the NBA. Hunter said the owners had made a crippling proposal, a long lockout loomed and these players in the room would bear the biggest financial and public relations burden of a work stoppage. And then he started to tell them he had thought long and hard about the way Oscar Robertson and Jerry West staged a protest at the 1964 All-Star Game, threatening a boycott until they had leveraged the league into the most rudimentary of medical benefits and pension contributions.

Yes, Hunter had been thinking long and hard, losing sleep over the possibility of declaring an uprising of his own. He dropped dramatic, long pauses and left everyone – including Stern, who had started barking into the ear of his deputy, Adam Silver – thinking that Hunter had come to advocate the players make some kind of bold stand themselves in Los Angeles. In the end, Hunter stopped short, insisting the All-Stars had an obligation to play the game, but the message to the players was unmistakable: Hunter wouldn’t back down to Stern, and maybe even had the ability to rattle him, the way the commissioner and owners had been trying to unnerve the players.

So livid, Stern would barely even look at Hunter when Hunter handed him the microphone. And soon, Stern started reciting his résumé, his decades of labor fights and legal battles in the NBA. Here’s how much the NBA was worth and here’s where I’ve brought it, he said. Everyone could see the anger rising within him, but no one expected the words that tumbled out of his mouth.

Stern told the room he knows where “the bodies are buried” in the NBA, witnesses recounted, because he had buried some of them himself.

 “It was shocking,” Chicago Bulls star Derrick Rose told Yahoo! Sports. “I was taking off my gear, and when he said that, I just stopped and thought, ‘Whoa …’

I hate to say it’s all coming to an end but this is the type of thing Stern would have squashed in his heyday.  He’s come off as a little, well, “loose” during recent interviews (most notably the Simmons podcast) where he seems like he’s taking his victory lap.  It seems as if these slip ups are intentional as if to remind everyone how powerful he is once was.

[Yahoo! Sports]

Share

Minnesota Vikings Lineman Bryant McKinnie Dropped $100K During All-Star Weekend Party

Beast mode.  From TMZ:

Minnesota Vikings superstar Bryant McKinnie was the ULTIMATE baller during a celebrity party at a Hollywood nightclub Thursday night — dropping more than $100,000 on his bar tab … TMZ has learned.

Sources at the NBA All-Star “Kick Off Party” at MyHouse nightclub — hosted by rapper Rick Ross and model Rosa Acosta — tell us the 6’8″, 335 lb lineman ordered more than 15 bottles of expensive champagne … among other things.

We’re told some of the bottles of champagne were so big — the entire club stopped to watch the wait staff bring them to Bryant’s area to crack ’em open.

Can anyone get Anthony Kim and Bryant McKinnie in the same room in Vegas somewhere?  Would you not pay $200 to watch them try to outspend each other?

[TMZ]

Share

Great Sports Writing: “Extreme Makeover”

The first half of the NBA season came to a conclusion last night and we’re headed into the All-Star weekend. The Spurs have obviously been dominant in the first half and perhaps the only team that could challenge them for the title of best team in the NBA thus far is the Boston Celtics. With this idea in mind, we invite you to take a trip back in time and re-examine the story that went into the assembly of Boston’s Big Three.  You’d be surprised by how fascinating it is to go back and re-examine details you had forgot about in just three short years (example: at the time, everyone thought Boston was taken advantage of in the deal for Ray Allen because Seattle got Delonte West — a coveted young guard at the time, Wally Szczerbiak, and the number five pick in the draft which became Jeff Green).  Step back in this literary time machine and watch how Danny Ainge assembled the best team in the Eastern Conference and brought back Celtic Pride.  From SI’s Ian Thomsen:

The Celtics’ 24-58 record last season was their worst in 10 years and included a franchise-record 18-game losing streak while a demoralized Pierce watched from the bench with a left foot injury. “We’re going through 10, 11, 12 games in a row lost, 13,” recalls Pierce, who missed the first 16 of those losses. “I was thinking, This team really has a future?”

Yet Ainge was not discouraged. Despite taking heat in Boston for his regular overhauls of the team, he felt he had accumulated enough assets to pull off a blockbuster trade. But even Ainge didn’t imagine last March that he would swing two significant deals that have dramatically revived the championship hopes of a franchise that had won only three playoff series since Larry Bird’s retirement in 1992.

By acquiring shooting guard Ray Allen from the Seattle SuperSonics and power forward Kevin Garnett from the Minnesota Timberwolves without relinquishing Pierce — forming an unparalleled trio of still-in-its prime NBA talent, with a cumulative 21 All-Star appearances and career scoring average of 65.6 points — Ainge made the Celtics relevant again.

As both a Boston player and executive, Ainge has not been afraid of the risks involved in acting boldly. Back in 1988, when he was one of the Celtics’ backcourt starters, he was seated at a table with Bird, forward Kevin McHale and team president Red Auerbach during the organization’s Christmas party. At the time Boston was reportedly considering trades that would have sent Bird and McHale to the Indiana Pacers and Dallas Mavericks, respectively. “Look at these two guys,” Ainge told Auerbach, over the surrounding conversations of other players and their families. “Larry’s got casts on his feet [from surgery to remove bone spurs in both heels], Kevin’s got a screw in his foot [to repair a stress fracture] — you’ve got to trade these guys.” Everyone laughed at Ainge’s typical audacity, but he wasn’t joking. “I would have traded Larry Bird,” he insists today.

A fascinating sub-plot this weekend is how Boston’s all-stars are going to treat the rest of their East teammates.  The Celtics are incredibly old school and have made it known they have no intentions of trying to get all buddy-buddy with the other players.  We’re predicting Doc sends out his four stars paired with Dwight Howard to